Write a comment

Sound: ******
Value: ******
(Read about our ratings)

Measurements can be found by clicking this link.

The Auris Audio Euterpe is, in some ways, the opposite of what I usually look for in audio gear. But that’s OK. Actually, it’s more than OK.

1 Comment

Sound: *********1/2
Value: ********
(Read about our ratings)

Measurements can be found by clicking this link.

Reviewers' ChoiceThe Monolith Liquid Platinum and Monolith THX 24459 are both headphone amps, and they both come from Monoprice, but otherwise, they couldn’t be more different. The tech behind the Liquid Platinum comes from artisanal amp designer Alex Cavalli, while the tech behind the Monolith 24459 comes from THX, a company known for its dedication to technical standards and measurements. The Liquid Platinum ($769.99 USD) is a plain ol’ amplifier, with nothing but a couple of tubes to distinguish it, while the Monolith THX 24459 ($479.99) is packed with technology, including a built-in DAC with digital inputs; a menu-driven control system with a front-panel display; and a digital signal processor (DSP) that allows parametric equalization, multiple filter modes, and Dirac Sensaround II headphone processing.

Write a comment

Sound: *********
Value: ******
(Read about our ratings)

Measurements can be found by clicking this link.

Alex Cavalli is to headphone amps what John Curl is to phono stages: not only the best-known designer of that type of product, but also the only one most audiophiles can readily name. Monoprice is to electronics companies what Amazon is to retailers: an often-resented competitor that consistently undercuts their price margins. When you combine the two, you get the Monoprice Monolith Liquid Platinum headphone amp by Alex Cavalli ($769.99 USD).

2 Comments

Sound: *******1/2
Value: **********
(Read about our ratings)

Measurements can be found by clicking this link.

Reviewers' ChoiceAs we watch an increasing number of companies throwing lots of money and metal into the design and manufacturing of headphone amps, it’s a good idea to consider what we really need in a headphone amp. What we don’t need is a powerful output stage or a big power supply, because headphones typically require only a few milliwatts of power -- roughly one-thousandth as much power as most speakers need. Nor do we need a heavy, elaborately machined metal chassis, because headphone amps needn’t be bulky. What we usually need is just a user-friendly design, a couple of inputs, and enough power to drive most headphones. The Schiit Fulla 2 desktop DAC-headphone amp ($99 USD) seems to be built with these goals -- and only these goals -- in mind.

Write a comment

Sound: *********
Value: ******** (Read about our ratings)

Measurements can be found by clicking this link.

Reviewers' ChoiceSince the rise in popularity of high-quality headphones, driven at least in part by the ubiquity of smartphone use, we’ve seen many products aimed at enhancing the listening experience of those on the go. iFi Audio’s xCAN can be described as a high-quality headphone amp designed to inconspicuously mate with your smartphone and fit in your pocket or purse. What distinguishes the xCAN from other similar products is its lack of a USB input for its internal DAC, which can be accessed only via Bluetooth. So who is the target demographic? First, the budget-conscious might be interested -- the xCAN costs only $299 USD, vs. iFi’s xDSD at $399. Second, perhaps, are users uninterested in fussing with USB connections but who want to enhance their smartphone listening experience by using what are still the two most common audio outputs: Bluetooth and the 3.5mm headphone jack.

Write a comment

Sound: ********
Value: *********

Measurements can be found by clicking this link.

Reviewers' ChoiceWith so many audio formats out there, audiophiles may be reluctant to invest in a new DAC-headphone amplifier. What if some download service starts releasing 16x DSD files or 64-bit PCM files? What if a company conjures up a new technology that promises to . . . I dunno, automatically search the Internet to find out who the mastering engineer was on a recording, then tune the sound to compensate for the phase shift of his mastering compressor? If we buy a new DAC-headphone amp today, and someone comes out with some “must have” technology tomorrow, we face the shame of having a hopelessly out-of-fashion component in the gear list in our online audio forum profiles. The iFi Audio xDSD ($399 USD) seems built specifically to qualm such fears.

Latest Comments

Geoffrey Morrison 11 minutes ago Greetings!
@oratory1990We're still working out the details for measurements. I probably won't be doing them personally. ...
oratory1990 8 hours ago Greetings!
Hi!

Will you be doing measurements as well?
Brent Butterworth 16 days ago A Fond Farewell
@ToddI have only used a few of them. None were great. Wirecutter recommends this one, ...
Todd 23 days ago A Fond Farewell
@Brent Butterworth  Usb Wired 
 I use a wired usb Microsoft headset  for work. It is durable and
the ...
Brent Butterworth 24 days ago A Fond Farewell
@ToddThanks, Todd! You mean wired or Bluetooth?
Todd 26 days ago A Fond Farewell
Best of luck Brent. I enjoy your writing and will miss your podcast. Can you ...
azlan 1 months ago Linsoul 7Hz Timeless Earphones
A lots of iem comin' But kings of Clarity is timeless Dun get the funny ...
Joe Pop 1 months ago A Fond Farewell
I have enjoyed your writing throughout your reviewing career and over that time I have ...
Harris Fogel 1 months ago A Fond Farewell
Fantastic!

Mauro 1 months ago A Fond Farewell
@MauroYou’ll miss my typos :)